articles tagged "Tonya Brito"

Shopping for Good

Wednesday, 12 December 2012 | A Public Affair
shopping-for-good

On Wednesday December 12th, host Tonya Brito interviewed author Dara O’Rourke about his recent book, “Shopping for Good.” Dara O’Rourke is Associate Professor of Environmental and Labor Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. He us also the Chairman of GoodGuide, Inc., a database for safe, healthy, green, and ethical products based on scientific ratings. He is author of “Community-Driven Regulation: Balancing Development and the Environment in Vietnam” (MIT Press) and coauthor of “Can We Put an End to Sweatshops?” “‘Buy local,’ ‘buy green,’ ‘buy organic,’ ‘fair trade’–how effective has the ethical consumption movement been in changing market behavior? Can consumers create fair and sustainable supply chains by shopping selectively? Dara O’Rourke, the activist-scholar who first broke the news about Nike’s sweatshops in the 1990s, considers the promise of ethical consumption–the idea that individuals, voting with their wallets, can promote better labor conditions and environmental outcomes globally. Governments have proven unable to hold companies responsible for labor and environmental practices. Consumers who say they want to support ethical companies often lack the knowledge and resources to do so consistently. But with the right tools, they may be able to succeed where governments have failed. Responding to O’Rourke’s argument, eight experts–Juliet Schor, Richard Locke, Scott Nova, Lisa Ann Richey, Margaret Levi, Andrew Szasz, Scott Hartley, and Auret van Herdeen–consider the connections between personal concerns and consumer activism, challenge the value of entrusting regulation to consumer efforts, and draw attention to difficulties posed by global supply chains.” -The MIT Press (September 21, 2012) Read more about “Shopping for Good:” http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/shopping-good-0 Read more about Dara O’Rourke: http://www.daraorourke.com/ Listen to the entire interview: more »

Slow Democracy

Wednesday, 28 November 2012 | A Public Affair
slow democracy

On Wednesday November 28th, host Tonya Brito spoke with author Susan Clark about her new book “Slow Democracy.” “Just as slow food encourages chefs and eaters to become more intimately involved with the production of local food, and slow money helps us become more engaged with our local economy, slow democracy encourages us to govern ourselves locally with processes that are inclusive, deliberative, and citizen powered. In Slow Democracy, community leader Susan Clark and democracy scholar Woden Teachout document the range of ways that citizens around the country are breathing new life into participatory democracy in their communities. In Slow Democracy, readers learn the stories of residents who gain community control of water systems and local forests, parents who find creative solutions to divisive and seemingly irreconcilable school-redistricting issues, and a host of other citizen-led actions that are reinvigorating local democracy and decision making. Along with real-life examples of slow democracy in action, Clark and Teachout also provide twenty simple guidelines for communities, and citizens, to use as ways to reinvigorate their local democratic process. With a future more and more focused on local food, local energy, and local economies, Slow Democracy offers strategies to improve our skills at local governance and to reinvigorate community democracy.” -Chelsea Green Publishing Read more about “Slow Democracy:” http://www.chelseagreen.com/bookstore/item/slow_democracy:paperback Listen to the entire interview: more »

Voter Supression

Wednesday, 14 November 2012 | A Public Affair
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On Wednesday November 14th, host Tonya Brito looked at voting rights issues following the Presidential election. During the first half of the show, she spoke with Jonathan Brater from the Brennan Center for Justice. Brater works for the Brennan Center’s Democracy Program focusing on voting rights and elections. According to the organization’s website, “The Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law is a non-partisan public policy and law institute that focuses on the fundamental issues of democracy and justice. Our work ranges from voting rights to campaign finance reform, from racial justice in criminal law to Constitutional protection in the fight against terrorism.” During the second half of the show, Tonya spoke with Stacy Harbaugh and Mike Wilder about issues of voter suppression here in Wisconsin. Stacy Harbaugh serves as the Communications Director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Wisconsin. Mike Wilder works as African-American Voter Engagement Table Director for the Milwaukee based group Citizen Action of Wisconsin. Read about the Brennan Center for Justice: http://www.brennancenter.org/ Read about Citizen Action of Wisconsin: http://citizenactionwi.org/ Read more about the American Civil Liberties Union of Wisconsin: http://aclu-wi.org/stacy-harbaugh-communications-director Listen to the entire program: more »

Stubborn Roots

Wednesday, 17 October 2012 | A Public Affair
Stubborn Roots

On Wednesday October 17th, host Tonya Brito spoke with Sociology professor Prudence Carter about her recent book, “Stubborn Roots, Race, Culture, and Inequality in U.S. and South African Schools.”   “What are the features of the school environment that make students’ of color incorporation greater at some schools than at others? Prudence L. Carter seeks to answer this basic but bedeviling question through a rich comparative analysis of the organizational and group dynamics in eight schools located within four cities in the United States and South Africa-two nations rebounding from centuries of overt practices of racial and social inequality. Stubborn Roots provides insight into how school communities can better incorporate previously disadvantaged groups and engender equity by addressing socio-cultural contexts and promoting “cultural flexibility.” It also raises important and timely questions about the social, political, and philosophical purposes of multiracial schooling that have been greatly ignored by many, and cautions against narrow approaches to education that merely focus on test-scores and resources.” -Oxford University Press Read more about the book: http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/Education/?view=usa&ci=9780199899654 Listen to the entire program: more »

Writing with Scissors: American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance

Wednesday, 3 October 2012 | A Public Affair
WritingwithScissorscover

On Wednesday October 3rd, host Tonya Brito spoke with author Ellen Gruber Garvey about her book “Writing with Scissors: American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance.” “What did ordinary Americans such as farmers and janitors have in common with extraordinary ones like Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Mark Twain, and Susan B. Anthony? In this fascinating cultural history, Ellen Gruber Garvey explores how Americans from all walks of life created scrapbooks to document, share, critique, and participate in a rapidly changing world of information overload. Featuring over sixty rare and hard-to-find illustrations, Writing with Scissors reveals how people have had an interactive relationship with the media since long before the Internet era. Writing with Scissors is a window into the reading of the 99 percent of the nineteenth century. It reveals a previously unexplored layer of American popular culture, where the proliferating cheap press touched the lives of activists and mourning parents, and all who yearned for a place in history. Scrapbook makers documented their feelings about momentous public events such as living through the Civil War, mediated through the newspapers. African Americans and women’s rights activists collected, concentrated, and critiqued accounts from a press that they did not control to create “unwritten histories” in books they wrote with scissors. Whether scrapbook makers pasted their clippings into blank books, sermon collections, or the pre-gummed scrapbook that Mark Twain invented, they claimed ownership of their reading. They created their own democratic archives.” -Oxford University Press To read more about Writing with Scissors: http://www.amazon.com/Writing-Scissors-American-Scrapbooks-Renaissance/dp/0199927693 To listen to the entire interview: more »

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