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TRIBUTE TO EDDIE TAYLOR!

Fri September 8, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

$10

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TRIBUTE TO EDDIE TAYLOR!

Fri September 8, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

$10

Tom Radai and David Miller Present:

TRIBUTE TO EDDIE TAYLOR!
EDDIE TAYLOR JR. – legendary guitarist and son of the late great Eddie Taylor, JIM LIBAN – world-famous harmonicist, JOEL PATERSON – guitar, KURT KOENIG – bass, MARK HAINES – from Chicago on drums!

This will be a night of Blues you won’t forget!

KC West Allis, 1800 S 92nd St, West Allis, WI 53214, From 7 pm -10 pm.
ADVANCED TICKETS ON SALE NOW FOR ONLY $10 or $15 at the Door!
Doors open 6:30 pm
PLEASE REMEMBER TO PRINT OUT THE TICKETS ONLINE FOR PROOF OF PURCHASE AT THE DOOR, PLUS SHARE AND INVITE YOUR FRIENDS!

Exciting new raffles to be unveiled at the Eddie Taylor Concert!
Ample parking!
Cash bar & food!

For additional information and Tickets, please call (414) 375-9895, visit www.EddieTaylorTribute.eventbrite.com, or Join our event on Facebook at www.facebook.com/events/779142198915625

Eddie Taylor Jr.:
*”b. Edward Taylor, c. 1971, Chicago, Illinois, USA. His father, Eddie Taylor, played blues guitar and sang mainly in Chicago and was for some years a valued sideman in Jimmy Reed’s band. Taylor Jnr. also took up guitar, teaching himself to play on an old instrument discarded by his father. Playing and singing contemporary Chicago blues, Taylor gradually developed his own name and reputation, building a repertoire that owes much to the traditions of the place and genre. These older songs include Robert Johnson’s ‘Stop Breakin’ Down’, Muddy Waters’ ‘Clouds In My Heart’, Syl Johnson’s ‘Sock It To Me’, Ricky Allen’s ‘Cut You Loose’, Magic Sam’s ‘Easy Baby’ and Taylor Snr.’s ‘I Feel So Bad’. He also writes original material, with notable tracks including ‘Red Hot Mama’, ‘Groovin’ With Eddie’, ‘Worried About My Baby’, ‘Can’t Take It No More’ and ‘Trying To Play A Mind Game’. Taylor’s older brothers, Tim and Larry, both play drums and three sisters, Edna, Brenda and Demetria, all sing as did their late mother, Vera Taylor. All five siblings appear with Taylor on his 2006 release Mind Game. In 2002, his youngest brother, Milton, was supportive in a markedly different way, donating a kidney when Taylor suffered serious illness.

Among other musicians who have worked in Taylor’s band are blues harpist Martin Lane and guitarist Johnny B. Moore. In addition to leading his own band, Taylor has also played in support of artists such as Moore, Little Arthur Duncan, Easy Baby, Willie Kent and Hubert Sumlin. Following his kidney transplant, Taylor resumed his very busy live schedule.” *http://www.allmusic.com/artist/eddie-taylor-jr-mn0000147175/biography

Jim Liban:
*”Singer, songwriter and stellar blues harmonica player Jim Liban was known throughout the midwest in the 1970’s as the leader of Short Stuff, the innovative Milwaukee based ensemble that pioneered the blues & rock sound later identified with bands like the Fabulous Thunderbirds and Stevie Ray Vaughn. He continues to perform in a more traditional vein with his trio. He has international cult status as one of the foremost post-war blues harmonica stylists, and many of his original songs have been recorded by national blues artists like Johnny Winter and Lonnie Brooks.” *https://www.bluesharmonica.com/jim_liban_interview

https://www.discogs.com/artist/3559511-Short-Stuff

Jim Liban YouTube videos:
Jim Liban Combo (Sitting On Top Of The World): https://youtu.be/tPXEH4ffauQ
Jim Liban and the Futuramics: https://youtu.be/_UeMBx6zNO8?list=RD_UeMBx6zNO8
Joel Paterson with Jim Liban – My Time Has Come and Gone: https://youtu.be/Z6A5CEpFd8A
Joe Filisko and Jim Liban- Walters Boogie: https://youtu.be/Y8w2PcSXU-g
Short Stuff “I Made A Mistake”: https://youtu.be/T23ASwy8snA

…AND MANY MORE ON YOUTUBE!

Joel Paterson:
*”Joel Paterson is one of the most respected guitarists on the Windy City music scene today. The blues/country/rockabilly/jazz guitar wizard has spent the last 10 years touring and recording with acts like Dave ‘Honey Boy’ Edwards, Wanda Jackson, Carl ‘Sonny’ Leyland, Jimmy Sutton’s Four Charms, Deke Dickerson, and his own Joel Paterson’s Blues Roundup and the Modern Sounds (who were voted best Chicago Jazz Band in the 2009 Chicago Reader Poll). While Paterson can recreate the sound and feel of guitar greats like Django Reinhardt, Tiny Grimes, Chet Atkins, Wes Montgomery, and Merle Travis, he can also nail the Chicago and delta blues idioms of guitarists like Blind Blake, Robert Nighthawk, Jimmy Rogers, and Freddie King. If that wasn’t enough, this guy can also tear it up on a pedal steel. Plain and simple this cat can play.” *http://www.cashboxkings.com/joel_paterson

*”Original album Liner Notes:

The idea to record an album with Jim Liban hit me in 2013 during a Sunday afternoon gig in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I hadn’t played with the harmonica legend in a few years, and the last time we shared the stage in 2010 it seemed like he was tiring of it all. After nearly fifty years in the music business and a recent period of personal tragedies and loss, Jim was quietly withdrawing from the music scene. But it was obvious that afternoon, that time had healed a few wounds. The fire, soul and harmonica mastery were still there as strong as ever; and we went on to rock the crowd just like the old days. It was clear from the first note I heard that day—Jim Liban was back, and I knew we needed to make a record.

I called Jim the next day in a manic state and left a rambling message on his answering machine (yes, Jim still has an answering machine). I told him that I wanted to produce a record for him, and that he should come down to Chicago and record it with my band at Hi-Style Studio. We would dust off some of his old original tunes. We would record together in the same room with vintage gear and small amps like the blues records we love. We would do everything our way and make a traditional—and original—blues album. Jim called me back the next day and responded to my grandiose idea with his signature dry wit, “Does this mean I have to buy new harps?”

In the mid ‘90s, Jim Liban was the first person to hire me to play guitar in a working band. I started commuting to Milwaukee from Madison several times a week to play shows all over Wisconsin. Jim was a consummate harmonica player, singer, entertainer and blues historian. I felt a real synergy between us when we played. His set was the perfect balance of soul and energy, and he taught me how to tastefully entertain without pandering to the audience and compromising the music. But I was in my twenties, had a mean blues purist streak, and of course thought I knew everything; and after a couple of years of too much traveling and an endless string of rough small town gigs, I grew tired of the “Cheese Circuit” and we quietly parted ways. I set my sights on Chicago, and my stint with Jim became a memory. But it was one that I came to appreciate more as I grew older and realized that as harmonica players go—they didn’t get much better than Jim Liban.

As a teenager in the mid 1960s, Jim Liban picked up the harmonica and became obsessed with the blues. This was at the beginning of the ‘60s blues revival, but the music was still very much alive for black audiences. Jim would scour local record stores for all the newest blues 45s and LPs. Too young to get into clubs, he started making trips to Maxwell Street in Chicago to see the music up close and in person. He started sitting in with blues legends at the Avant Garde coffeehouse in Milwaukee, playing sets with the likes of Big Joe Williams, Sleepy John Estes, Arthur Crudup, Yank Rachel and Big Walter Horton.

In 1968 it was time to make a move and Jim’s band, The New Blues, moved to San Francisco to be in the thick of the ‘60s music scene. They crashed at Steve Miller’s pad to get a start; and after changing their name to A.B. Skhy, they were soon opening up for the big psychedelic acts of the day. One night at The Whisky a Go Go in LA, Jimi Hendrix sat in and jammed with them for a few songs. Jim Liban remembers, “literally going eyeball to eyeball” with the guitar icon while trading licks on “Hoochie Coochie Man.” After a mention from Hendrix in Billboard Magazine about up-and-coming bands to look out for, A.B. Skhy got a contract from MGM Records. During the recording sessions, Jim was becoming increasingly disenchanted with the psychedelic direction they were taking. His blues purist streak and artistic temperament would often shine at inopportune times, and Jim walked out of the band in the middle of the record and moved back to Milwaukee. Though he has no regrets, this was just one episode in a music career with its share of near misses.

In 1969, Jim settled in Milwaukee and for the next fifteen years his band, Short Stuff, established itself as one of the most popular and hardest working bands in the area. With Jim leading the band and sharing vocal duties with keyboardist Junior Brantley, Short Stuff created a crowd-pleasing mix of Chicago blues, funk and soul. In the early ‘80s, they tired of keeping up with the times; and Jim dissolved the band to take some time off. After a stint in Nashville to be a songwriter and sideman, Jim wanted to get back to playing some blues. In 1988 he returned to Milwaukee and played for years as The Jim Liban Blues Combo. This is where our paths first crossed in 1994.

Twenty years later, making a record with Jim Liban would become one of the more meaningful projects of my career. To start production, I told Jim I needed to hear some of his old songs. I drove up to Milwaukee to hang out and didn’t realize I would return to Chicago with a shopping bag full of thirty years worth of cassette tapes. Jim Liban is a prolific songwriter. He has written songs recorded by John Mayall, Johnny Winter, Lonnie Brooks, The Legendary Blues Band, Little Charlie and The Nightcats and many others. I thought producing the great American blues record sounded like a glamorous endeavor, but the project soon became three months of me sitting next to a Radio Shack cassette player with a pen and a pile of Post-it notes.

I gave Jim a list of about thirty tunes I wanted to mess around with, and this started the process of recording demos in my apartment. It was a labor of love reworking and updating his songs, and Jim was very receptive to making new arrangements of songs that went back decades. When it was time to go into the studio with Beau Sample, Alex Hall, Mark Haines and Matt Liban, we were ready to record the blues album that I have always wanted to make.

“I Say What I Mean” is not just a comeback. It is a snapshot of a life in blues, a tribute to all of our blues heroes, a loving tribute to Jim’s late wife, and a reunion with one of my heroes and first musical influences.
These fourteen original blues songs are proof that Jim Liban says what he means, and indeed means just what he says.
– Joel Paterson” *https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/jimliban

More info on Paterson can be found at: www.joelpaterson.com

Kurt Koenig:
*”Bass Player · 2006 to 2014 · Milwaukee, Wisconsin” *https://www.facebook.com/kurt.koenig.16/about

Mark Haines:
*”Chicago native and 25 year veteran of the Midwest blues scene, Mark Haines is celebrated for his powerful and tastefully musical drumming.

From the most primitive early Chicago-style slow blues, to an elegant swinging shuffle, Haines inspires the CBK’s to find the deepest groove.

Working with fellow CBK Joel Paterson since the ’80’s, Mark has shared the stage with Dave “Honeyboy” Edwards, Bo Diddley and Marcia Ball, to name a few.

Besides his work on the drum throne, Mark is also an accomplished recording engineer with an Oscar winning song, “Al Otro Lado Del Rio” from the film “Motorcycle Diaries” (2005) and countless albums to his credit including 3 CBK releases, Joel Paterson’s “Steel is Real” and Jimmy Sutton’s Four Charms “Flatland Boogie” disc.” *http://cashboxkings.com/mark_haines

Some information about the promoters:

Tom Radai

*Tom Radai is the longest surviving Blues agent/Mgr.in the USA. The multiple WC Handy/ KBA recipient, European Music Award and National Leadership Award winner, has been in business longer then anyone still active in the Blues Scene. Tom has said that his curiosity about Blues culture peaked when he started hanging out at Maxwell Street in the early 1960’s and meeting some of the people who were eventually to become his clients. His love for the music came at an even earlier age when most teenagers were interested in other things. Tom Radai’s roots in the Blues are long and deep. Initially launching his career in booking and management in 1964 with his first client, Otis Spann. Tom soon added to his talent roster the likes of Johnny Young, Eddie Taylor, Johnny Littlejohn and Charlie Musselwhite from 1968 to 1979. Tom Radai’s Blues Management Group soon became notorious for the ‘Blues All Star’ packages he toured world-wide. One such package based out of Chicago teamed Jimmy Rogers and Eddie Taylor, Detroit Jr./Johnny ‘Big Moose’ Walker, Wild Child Butler, Sam Lay, Bob Anderson and Lucile Spann. A few years after this package toured the legendary Jimmy Rogers became a full time client which lead to a relationship lasting nearly 25 years, which included engagements with the Rolling Stones and Eric Clapton, numerous national television appearances, and a monumental recording on Atlantic Records.

On January 8, 2001, Tom Radai was instrumental in re-naming the South Honore Street in Chicago “Jimmy Rogers St”. A ‘West-coast AllStar’ package that Tom organized in the late 1970’s included the legendary George ‘Harmonica’ Smith teamed with the great Phillip Walker plus a second young harmonica genius by the name of William Clarke. In addition to his Blues credentials, Tom has promoted Rock & Blues concert series that included The Grateful Dead, Quicksilver Messenger, and Canned Heat. Tom Radai’s talent roster had included: The Phillip Walker Band, The Jimmy Rogers Legacy (tribute to Jimmy Rogers.) Eddie Taylor Jr., Steve Guyger, plus ‘The NEW Legends Of Blues AllStars’ (Eddie Taylor Jr., Steve Guyger, Bob Stroger, Billy Flynn and ‘Piano Willie’). In addition The NEW Legends Of Blues Duo with Steve Guyger and Billy Flynn. Tom has been a tireless advocate for Traditional Blues, one reason why over 75% of his talent roster have stayed for an unprecedented 15 to 25 years. He is still doing business in the USA, Canada, Europe. Tom can be reached at: The Blues Mgt Group -2413 South 51st St. Milwaukee Wisconsin 53219 USA ph:414.321.0188 https://facebook.com/BluesManagementGroup

David J. Miller

David J. Miller is a multiple genre Harmonicist, Vocalist, Guitarist, Teacher, Promoter, President of Jazz Unlimited of Greater Milwaukee, and Owner. Dave Miller teaches beginning to advanced harmonica, beginning voice, and basic blues guitar. David was introduced to the harmonica back in 1972 by his late father at the age of eleven years old. Dave’s dad was his mentor, but his other influences also include: Charlie Musselwhite, James Cotton, Billy Branch, Little Walter, Big Walter Horton, Sonny Boy Williamson, Junior Wells, to name just a few. David Miller has appeared throughout the Midwest. Some of the venues included the Wisconsin State Fair, Summerfest, Sherman Fest, as well as various Chicago clubs. Miller has played with Billy Branch, the legendary Aaron Moore, Willie Kent, Billy Flynn, Aron Burton, and Johnny Rawls. The Dave Miller Band provides a high energy eclectic repertoire from Rock to Blues. The members of the band are as follows: David J. Miller (harmonicist, vocalist, & guitarist), Bill Martin (lead guitarist), Hal Miller (bassist), and Andrew Wilson (drummer). The Dave Miller Band is all professional and highly experienced musicians, eager to satisfy the fans all the way to the venue owners. David Miller Live Music Promotions can fulfill any venue with virtually any genre. Dave Miller also works with the legendary Tom Radai in booking other venues. For inquiries or bookings; Email: David@DavidMiller.us, Call: (414) 375-9895, or Web: http://www.DavidMiller.us/! See also http://www.DavidMiller.us/PromoPack!

*THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS!
>Wisconsin Blues Society
>Brenda Taylor Ricci, THANK YOU for helping to keep your father’s music alive by your amazing website! The REAL story of the this Blues legend is said so well here: www.purpleoctavellcpublishing.com/index.htm

Details

Date:
Fri September 8, 2017
Time:
7:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Cost:
$10
Event Category:
Event Tags:
, ,
Website:
http://www.EddieTaylorTribute.eventbrite.com

Venue

Knights of Columbus West Allis
1800 S 92nd St
West Allis, WI United States
Phone:
(414) 375-9895
Website:
phcwi-madison.org

Submit your event to the WORT calendar.

When submitting music events to the WORT calendar, you must choose at least one music genre for a music event to be published.

Details

Date:
Fri September 8, 2017
Time:
7:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Cost:
$10
Event Category:
Event Tags:
, ,
Website:
http://www.EddieTaylorTribute.eventbrite.com

Venue

Knights of Columbus West Allis
1800 S 92nd St
West Allis, WI United States
Phone:
(414) 375-9895
Website:
phcwi-madison.org

Submit your event to the WORT calendar.

When submitting music events to the WORT calendar, you must choose at least one music genre for a music event to be published.

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